Reference

These are old references I stumble across they are a good read.

Karma

Karma is simply the process of cause and effect. Karma is the physical manifestation of the law of balance and harmony, as it applies to the results of decisions reached and attitudes held by beings capable of free will and choice. A karmic experience is a challenge to an individual to reconsider a choice, or an attitude, to see if these decisions upon a misunderstanding of The Laws of the System.

Karma is not an entity but a process, action, energy and force. Some interpret this force as action-influence. It is our own doings reacting on ourselves. The pain and happiness are the results of deeds, words and thoughts reacting on themselves. Our deeds, words and thoughts produce our prosperity, failure, happiness and misery. It is an impersonal, natural law operating in its own field without the intervention of external, independent ruling agencies.

Karma is the concept of deed as that which causes the entire cycle of cause and effect. Karma is logical. It is an unavoidable consequence of our creations. When we create anything, we also create other things which might not be what we intended.

Karma works on many levels we could say, it has both subtle and grosser qualities taking effect in an infinite number of ways, yet all results stem from a cause, and all actions belong to the doer of the actions. We each become subject to the results of our own doings, but not necessarily straight away, and not necessarily will we recognize the effects of our actions as being likened to the cause, yet we can know by our own experiences that where we apply ourselves with good intentions we are likely to get good results, and where we apply ourselves with intentions which are motivated by ill-will, greed, selfishness, or hatred, then we will likely get results which we consider to be negative results, leading to further dissatisfaction and suffering. This is because karma is interactive throughout all things at all times and so the effects of our actions will also be influenced and balanced with an uncountable number of other inter-woven causes and effects. But time has proven to us through demonstration that on a larger scale we ourselves are the benefactors of our karma, we can expect to benefit if we act accordingly to the way, which is right, and we can expect to experience suffering if we choose to act in ways, which are conducive to harm.

Good Karma

Karma pertains mostly to attitudes and consciousness. The Cayce readings did not indicate adverse karmic effects for policemen or soldiers who are compelled to maintain safety or under orders, and had to execute people or employ violent methods. The readings however indicated severe karmic penalties for jeering mobs during the Roman persecution of Christians and in a particular, a spectator who laughed when a lion ripped out the side of a Christian girl. Neither the spectator nor the mob did any actual physical harm. It is My Karma One of the most distorted views of karma is the idea of destiny. No matter how terrible the predicament, there is always something that can be done, even if it is a patient smile or maintaining a good attitude. Within adverse conditions often lies the opportunity.

Law of Karma

The law of Karma (Sanskrit) or Kamma (Pali) originated in the Vedic system of religion, otherwise known as Hinduism. The term traces back to the early Upanishads, around 1500 BCE. In its major conception, karma is the physical, mental and suprarenal system of neutral rebound, cause and effect that is inherent in existence within the bounds of time, space, and causation. Essentially what this means is that the very being which one experiences (say, as a human being) is an immutable preservation of energy, vibration, and action. It is comparable to the Golden Rule but denies the ostensible arbitrariness of Fate, Destiny, Kismet, or other such Western conceptions by attributing absolute reason and determinism to the workings of the cosmos. Karma, for these reasons, naturally implies reincarnation since thoughts and deeds in past lives will affect one’s current situation. Thus, humanity (through a sort of collective karma) and individuals alike are responsible for the tragedies and good ‘fortunes’ that they experience. The concept of an inscrutable God figure is not necessary with the idea of karma. It is vital to note that karma is not an instrument of a god, or a single God, but is rather the physical and spiritual ‘physics’ of being. As gravity governs the motions of heavenly bodies and objects on the surface of the earth, karma governs the motions and happenings of life, inanimate and animate, unconscious and conscious, in the cosmic realm. Thus, what certain philosophical viewpoints may term destiny or fate is in actuality, according to the laws of karma, the simple and neutral working out of karma. Many have likened karma to a moral banking system, a credit and debit of good and bad. However, this view falls short of the idea that any sort of action (action being a root meaning of ‘karma’), whether we term it ‘good’ or ‘bad’, binds us in recurring cause and effect. In order to attain supreme consciousness, to escape the cycle of life, death, and rebirth and the knot of karma one must altogether transcend karma. This method of transcendence in many streams of not only Hinduism and Buddhism, but other faiths and philosophical systems as well.

New Age Karma

The idea of karma in the west through the work of the Theosophical Society. Kardecist and Western New Age reinterpretations of karma frequently cast it as a sort of luck, which is associated with virtue: if one does good or spiritually valuable acts, one deserves and can expect good luck; contrariwise, if one does harmful things, one can expect bad luck or unfortunate happenings. In this conception, karma is the Neopagan law of return or Threefold Law, the idea that the beneficial or harmful effects one has on the world will return to oneself. Health, Relationships, Abilities, Genius, Free Will, Opportunities Sickness or afflictions attributed to misdeeds in the past, as well as merits, fortunes, etc. to meritorious works, etc. Karma affects the quality of relationships. For example, people who either love or hate each other tend to attract each other (See also Parabadha Karma). Karma dictates that an individual is responsible for his current situation and future situation. Current abilities, talents and inclinations can attribute to past development of these talents or involvement with the same (See also Sanchita Karma and Samskara). In this context, DNA and genes only accommodate and do not determine talents and abilities. In other words you can develop more talents and abilities. Karma however is not a rigid iron-cast system. E.g. Accidents happen outside the workings of karma and free will is a powerful factor in determining the course of life. A person must also exercise his free will in determining his destiny despite karmic factors. Karma also dictates that opportunities depend on how one deal with what one has. I.e. take advantage of what is already available at hand.

Personal Karma

Each individual creates their own karma by experiencing results, their ability to learn, and their disregard for experiencing. We create our own capacities and limitations. Karma is the need to know more about a feeling, or an action, to make one’s knowledge more complete and whole. It is the necessity to experience an action or thought more fully, or from a different perspective, so that you understand it as completely as possible in order to maintain balance in your mental creations. You cannot project perfect creations unless you understand the materials, tools, and processes of creation completely, and have experienced the repercussions of your actions. A person exists to experience all forms of materiality, to understand each thoroughly, and to learn how to manipulate and maintain these forms in balance and harmony. As the individual evolves, studies his progress and finds there is a gap in his understanding, at some point in time the gap with the appropriate experience to balance it out. Karma is the need to experience. To fill gaps in the understanding of the experiences gained. It is a lack of understanding of all the points of view that apply, and an awareness that is necessary.

Western Karma

According to Karma, performance of positive action results with the reaction of a good conditioning in one’s experience, whereas a negative action results in a reaction of a bad response. This may be an immediate result following the act, or a delayed result occurring either in the present life or in the next. Thus, meritorious acts may create rebirth into a higher station, such as a superior human being or a godlike being, while evil acts result in rebirth as a human living in less desirable circumstances, or as a lower animal. While God or gods may compare the action of karma with the Western notions of sin and judgment, Karma operates as an inherent principle of the Universe without the intervention of any supernatural being. Most teachings say that for common mortals, having an involvement with Karma is an unavoidable part of day-to-day living. However, in light of the Hindu philosophical school of Vedanta, as well as Gautama Buddha’s teachings, one avoids control or become mindful of the effects of desires and aversions as a way to moderate or change one’s karma (or, more accurately, one’s karmic results).

 

 

 

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Karma touch may be seen either as a fixed sequence of events that is inevitable and unchangeable, or that individuals choose their own destiny by choosing different paths throughout their life.

 

Bad Karma

Karma works on many levels we could say, it has both subtle and grosser qualities taking effect in an infinite number of ways, yet all results stem from a cause, and all actions belong to the doer of the actions. We each become subject to the results of our own doings, but not necessarily straight away, and not necessarily will we recognize the effects of our actions as being likened to the cause, yet we can know by our own experiences that where we apply ourselves with good intentions we are likely to get good results, and where we apply ourselves with intentions which are motivated by ill-will, greed, selfishness, or hatred, then we will likely get results which we consider to be negative results, leading to further dissatisfaction and suffering. This is because karma is interactive throughout all things at all times and so the effects of our actions will also be influenced and balanced with an uncountable number of other inter-woven causes and effects. But time has proven to us through demonstration that on a larger scale we ourselves are the benefactors of our karma, we can expect to benefit if we act accordingly to the way, which is right, and we can expect to experience suffering if we choose to act in ways, which are conducive to harm. Over an inconceivable amount of time we believe we have taken re-birth once again in the human realm where we can develop and cultivate our higher wisdom and reap the benefits of doing so, with good results we then should dedicate the merits created by our good deeds to all beings without exception, there is greater merit in doing good deeds for others and cultivating good qualities with good will towards others, than there is doing good things for oneself and close associations alone. The Buddha teaches that we should express ourselves in ways, which are wise, and incorporate compassion and kindness towards others; this is also being a cause for merits in the world and all beings up to and including the Buddha’s. We should rejoice at the well being of others, and try to maintain our practice with the effect that we cause some goodness in the world. It could be noted that there is no good karma or bad karma as such, karma is simply the working law of cause and effect, so whatever karma takes a result it is simply a result, whether that is good or bad is distinguished by our personal preferences and opinions at the time, as such we give it a category in either ‘good’ or ‘bad’, but in reality karma is neither good or bad, it is just the way things turn out according to the deeds we do, so we should take some care in choosing how we act in this life, without due care we are likely to revolve in the cyclic existence of Samsara getting lost again and again, inhabiting the realms of others where suffering takes on a new meaning, and all because we lived in ignorance. By choosing to develop mindfulness in our ways we can create better circumstances both for ourselves and in turn for all others also, but all this should be done while developing a selfless attitude in life with intentions which are good. Because karma is a complex system of dynamically inter-related actions and their effects it is impossible to predetermine how the results of our deeds will take effect, for this reason it is considered to be an ‘unconjecturable’, if one were to attempt to know all the results and causes of their experiences they would still never know even after an inconceivable amount of time it would be like attempting to know the square sum of infinity. It is much better for one to pay attention and be heedful of their thoughts, speech, and actions in order to create causes for positive change, one should know how karma works to some extent, such knowledge is beneficial at times, but it is much more important to be aware of what is going on in the here and now. It is important to know that our karma is not fixed or definite, and so if we have created circumstances, which are harmful or cause us, suffering then we can still put the teachings of the eightfold path to practice and begin to change things for the better in the longer term. Likewise one should be careful not to undo any good results by being careless in their ways any further than one already has been in the past. Kamma is simply action. Within animate organisms there is a power or force, which different names such as instinctive tendencies, consciousness, etc. This innate propensity forces every conscious being to move. He moves mentally or physically. His motion is action. The repetition of actions is habit and habit becomes his character. In Buddhism, this process is called Kamma. ‘Kamma is volition,’ says the Buddha. In its ultimate sense, Kamma means both good and bad, mental action or volition… Since there are no hidden agent directing or administering rewards and punishments, Buddhist does not rely on prayer to supernatural forces to influence karmic results. According to the Buddha, Kamma is not not not not nether predestination nor some sort of determinism imposed on us by some mysterious, unknown powers or forces to which we must helplessly submit ourselves. Buddhists believe that man will reap what he has sown; we are the result of what we were, and we will be the result of what we are. In other words, man is not one who will absolutely remain what he was, and he will not continue to remain as what he is. This simply means that Kamma is not complete determinism. The Buddha pointed out that if everything were determined, and then there would be no free will and no moral or spiritual life. We would merely be the slaves of our past. There would be no cultivation of moral and spiritual growth. Therefore, the Buddha accepted neither strict determinism nor strict indeterminism.

 

Actress Karma

 

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Kamma game

 

Kamma is simply action. Within animate organisms there is a power or force, which different names such as instinctive tendencies, consciousness, etc. This innate propensity forces every conscious being to move. He moves mentally or physically. His motion is action. The repetition of actions is habit and habit becomes his character. This process is Kamma in Buddhism. ‘Kamma is volition,’ says the Buddha. In its ultimate sense, Kamma means both good and bad, mental action or volition…